Frittata with Chorizo + Queso Fresco [gluten-free and keto]

Frittata with Chorizo + Queso Fresco [Gluten-Free and Keto]

I always tell myself I’m going to wake up before my kids, but every morning that snooze button proves irresistible. Usually I wake up to the sound of my youngest yelling “Mama!” from his crib. Then my husband and I play a silent game of waiting to see who’s going to get him while the other pretends to sleep. I’ve never admitted to playing this game, but let’s be honest—it happens almost every morning.

Eventually I roll out of bed to retrieve my youngest (at least on the days when I manage to get up first), and then head to the kitchen to get started on breakfast for him and his two siblings.

Just like my kids, I have to eat a good breakfast in the morning. A granola bar just doesn’t cut it for me. I notice hunger strike just an hour or two later or a crash in my energy level if I don’t eat a protein-rich meal. But too often, starting my day with the cries of my kids means my breakfast gets put on the back-burner.

Enter the frittata.

In this season of life, with four-year-old twins and a two-year-old, make-ahead meals or recipes I can eat all week long are key. This dish is perfect for that. I can make this Chorizo Frittata on Monday morning and have enough for a week’s worth of breakfast for my husband and me. Or, I can prep it on a Friday night for a hearty weekend brunch (and plenty of leftovers!).

It’s also a great mix-and-match recipe. Instead of chorizo and queso fresco, saute crumbled Italian sausage and mix in fresh mozzarella. Or in lieu of a meat-heavy dish, load it up with vegetables like mushrooms and tomatoes. While I love the way the recipe is written below, it’s definitely a dish you can adjust according to whatever is left in your fridge.

For this recipe, I used queso fresco, a Mexican cheese typically made from cow’s milk or a mix of cow and goat milk. It’s a fresh, crumbly cheese that has a bit of tang, so it helps balance out the richness of the chorizo. If you like, you could try substituting other cheeses such as cheddar.

After cooking the frittata, I love topping it with fresh cilantro. This bright herb adds a freshness to a hearty egg dish. If you aren’t a cilantro lover, though (my husband says it tastes like soap), you could always substitute fresh parsley instead.

Try serving this dish alongside fresh fruit, tender greens with a splash of oil and vinegar, or breakfast potatoes. It makes a great brunch dish or can be enjoyed on its own.

Or, if you’re like me, just heat up leftovers in the microwave and snag a few bites while you chase down your kiddos.

Frittata with Chorizo + Queso Fresco [Gluten-Free and Keto]
Frittata with Chorizo + Queso Fresco [Gluten-Free and Keto]
Frittata with Chorizo + Queso Fresco [Gluten-Free and Keto]
Frittata with Chorizo + Queso Fresco [Gluten-Free and Keto]
Frittata with Chorizo + Queso Fresco [Gluten-Free and Keto]
Frittata with Chorizo + Queso Fresco [Gluten-Free and Keto]
Frittata with Chorizo + Queso Fresco [Gluten-Free and Keto]
Frittata with Chorizo + Queso Fresco [Gluten-Free and Keto]
Frittata with Chorizo + Queso Fresco [Gluten-Free and Keto]
Frittata with Chorizo + Queso Fresco [Gluten-Free and Keto]
Frittata with Chorizo + Queso Fresco [Gluten-Free and Keto]

Frittata with Chorizo + Queso Fresco [Gluten-Free and Keto]
Yields about 8 servings

1 Tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
1 medium yellow onion, diced
1 red bell pepper, diced
12 ounces Mexican-style chorizo (I like to use mild), casings removed
12 large eggs
5 ounces queso fresco, crumbled (plus more for topping)
¼ cup whole milk
1 Tablespoon chopped fresh cilantro (plus more for topping)
½ teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

In a 9- to 10-inch cast-iron or other ovenproof skillet, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add the diced onion and bell pepper. Sauté for 5-6 minutes or until softened.

Add the chorizo, breaking up the pieces with a wooden spoon. Cook for about 5 more minutes, and then turn off the heat.

While the chorizo cooks, in a large bowl, whisk together the eggs, queso fresco, milk, cilantro, salt, and black pepper.

Pour the egg mixture over the chorizo, and give everything a stir. Transfer to the oven and cook 14-16 minutes, just until the eggs are set. (I like to remove the frittata from the oven just shy of them being fully cooked, because they’ll continue to cook slightly even when they come out of the oven.)

Remove from the oven and let sit for 5 minutes. Slice and top with more crumbled queso fresco and chopped cilantro.


French Toast with Cherry Compote + Vanilla Bean Whipped Cream [plus an essay about being seen and an invite to the C+C Mother's Day Brunch!]

French Toast with Cherry Compote + Vanilla Bean Whipped Cream #breakfast #brunch #frenchtoast

We slide into the diner booth, scooting along the faux leather benches as our server hands us an impossibly large menu. My husband sits next to me and my dad in the seat across from us. Going to a place like this reminds me of my childhood. I grew up in New Jersey where diners are about as common as Starbucks in the Chicago suburbs. There's one on every corner, each with giant, plastic-covered menus showcasing all kinds of omelettes, skillets, French toast, crepes, sandwiches, and anything else you could possibly think to eat for breakfast or lunch.

I scan the menu as we catch up about my husband’s job and my dad’s new house. I try to keep the conversation light, but my heart feels heavy—maybe even a little guilty. Having my dad and stepmom in town is a gift, but over the last week I’ve been so weary that I feel like I’ve missed out on being with them. I take another sip of my coffee and internally lament the fact that my stepmom had to stay home with my kids just so I could have a few minutes of uninterrupted conversation with my dad.

Our plates arrive, and we drizzle on syrup and request refills of coffee. My dad looks at me and asks the question I hoped to avoid. “How are you doing? Really?”

It’s the “really” that gets me. The addition of that little word tells me I can’t get away with a scripted answer. My emotions sit too close to the surface, and any effort to hide them proves futile.

Keep reading and get the recipe at Coffee + Crumbs.

French Toast with Cherry Compote + Vanilla Bean Whipped Cream #breakfast #brunch #frenchtoast
French Toast with Cherry Compote + Vanilla Bean Whipped Cream #breakfast #brunch #frenchtoast
French Toast with Cherry Compote + Vanilla Bean Whipped Cream #breakfast #brunch #frenchtoast
French Toast with Cherry Compote + Vanilla Bean Whipped Cream #breakfast #brunch #frenchtoast
French Toast with Cherry Compote + Vanilla Bean Whipped Cream #breakfast #brunch #frenchtoast
French Toast with Cherry Compote + Vanilla Bean Whipped Cream #breakfast #brunch #frenchtoast
French Toast with Cherry Compote + Vanilla Bean Whipped Cream #breakfast #brunch #frenchtoast
French Toast with Cherry Compote + Vanilla Bean Whipped Cream #breakfast #brunch #frenchtoast
French Toast with Cherry Compote + Vanilla Bean Whipped Cream #breakfast #brunch #frenchtoast

Read the full essay and get the recipe at Coffee + Crumbs.


Cold Brew Granola with Chocolate, Walnuts + Chia Seeds

Cold Brew Granola with Chocolate, Walnuts + Chia Seeds | Sarah J. Hauser

Happy Tuesday! How’s your week going? Yeah, I realize we’re only a few days in, but anyone else feel like this week has been about a month long? My kiddos are fighting sickness, and the weather here is still gloomy (although about 40 degrees warmer than last week!). We’ve read all the books, played with Play-Doh, watched movies, spilled Cheerios, snuggled on the couch, and laughed a lot (four-year-olds are hilarious, by the way). And now I need to refuel with coffee and chocolate.

I make recipes with that combination a lot, and maybe it’s overdone…or maybe it’s just that good. Whatever. May coffee and chocolate enjoy a long and happy life together, because they truly make the perfect pair.

I shared this granola recipe a few years ago on an old blog I had, and I decided it was time to give it a facelift. It’s made with cold brew coffee concentrate (I use FreshGround Roasting’s Black Ice Brew), but in a pinch you could use regular strong coffee. This time around, I added in cacao nibs instead of chocolate chips in an attempt to be more healthy, but use whichever you prefer. Throw in some dried cherries, extra nuts, or a hint of cardamom for even more flavor options.

Scroll down to get the recipe!

Cold Brew Granola with Chocolate, Walnuts + Chia Seeds | Sarah J. Hauser
Cold Brew Granola with Chocolate, Walnuts + Chia Seeds | Sarah J. Hauser
Cold Brew Granola with Chocolate, Walnuts + Chia Seeds | Sarah J. Hauser
Cold Brew Granola with Chocolate, Walnuts + Chia Seeds | Sarah J. Hauser
Cold Brew Granola with Chocolate, Walnuts + Chia Seeds | Sarah J. Hauser
Cold Brew Granola with Chocolate, Walnuts + Chia Seeds | Sarah J. Hauser

Cold Brew Granola with Chocolate, Walnuts + Chia Seeds
Yields about 4 cups

3 cups rolled oats
½ cup walnuts, coarsely chopped
½ cup cacao nibs or semi-sweet chocolate chips
½ cup cold brew coffee concentrate or strong coffee
⅓ cup honey (sub maple syrup for vegan)
2 Tablespoons cocoa powder
2 Tablespoons olive oil (preferably “light tasting”)
1 Tablespoon chia seeds (optional)
¼ teaspoon sea salt

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. In a large bowl, add all the ingredients and mix well.

Pour mixture onto the baking sheet and spread into a thin layer.

Bake for 35-45 minutes until the granola is crisp, stirring gently 2-3 times throughout the baking process.

Remove the granola from the oven and let it cool completely. Transfer to an airtight container and store until you’re ready to serve. Serve with milk, yogurt, fresh fruit, or additional honey.


Swedish Tea Ring [and practicing remembrance]

Swedish Tea Ring | Sarah J. Hauser

Of the six kids in my family, three of us live in the Chicago area and three live in New Jersey where we grew up. Every year, a few weeks before Christmas, the girls who live nearby in the Chicago suburbs get together to bake. We make couple batches of family-favorite cookies—like chocolate mint cookies and krumkake, a Norwegian waffle-like cookie. Most importantly, though, we make my mom’s Swedish tea ring. Truth be told, it’s actually Betty Crocker’s recipe, but it’s the version we ate on Christmas morning every year as kids.

Swedish tea ring (at least the one we grew up with) is a pastry filled with cinnamon, brown sugar, and raisins and topped with a simple glaze. As kids, we always ate it with cheesy eggs—the two recipes yielding the perfect sweet and savory combination.

Now, the meal reminds me of my mom. It reminds me of our family. And it reminds me of so many Christmases over the years—like the one when we didn’t have money for gifts so we regifted our own things to each other (which still remains the best Christmas ever). Or when we attempted to buy the “tallest of allest” Christmas tree. It turned out to be way too big for our family room, and we chopped off the top to make it fit. Or the first Christmas my husband and I had as a married couple—the same one spent unexpectedly in the hospital with my mom as doctors performed surgery for pancreatic cancer, cancer which took her life just over two years later.

After my mom died, it seemed all the more important to me that we make Swedish tea ring. When life changes, sometimes traditions change with it. This needed to remain. I wanted to practice folding the dough perfectly and shaping it like she did. I wanted to savor those Christmas morning moments with my own kids the way I did years ago.

I have a few more Christmases to go before reaching her level of baking expertise. One year, I forgot that the dough recipe yields two tea rings. My husband and I went to church with his family on Christmas Eve, and I mixed the flour, sugar, and yeast before we left so the dough could rise while we were gone. When we came home, I noticed much to my horror it had risen so big and wide that it seeped over the sides of the pan, looking like Swedish tea blob. (Thankfully it still tasted good.)

But for as long as I can manage, Swedish tea ring will grace our table on Christmas morning. The tradition of making it with the women in my family is one I pray will continue. The pastry and the hands who make it serve as a tangible reminder of my mom, our family’s story, and all that God has done in our lives. It reminds me who we are and what we love. It reminds me that in both good times and hard times, God remains faithful. He was good when we ate this as a family decades ago, and he was good the first Christmas I ate it after my mom died. And he’s good now.

A couple weeks ago, my kids joined our annual tradition, alongside my sister, sister-in-law, and three of my nieces. My twins are just three years old, but they carefully rolled out dough and sprinkled it with brown sugar and raisins. They may not remember this Christmas, but the act of baking with them and others in my family flooded my mind with memories of how far God brought us. He’s brought us through seasons of grief and joy, weariness and flourishing. All along, he’s been faithful and good. May that be a truth I never forget.

Merry Christmas.

(Scroll down for the recipe.)

Swedish Tea Ring | Sarah J. Hauser
Swedish Tea Ring | Sarah J. Hauser
Swedish Tea Ring | Sarah J. Hauser
Swedish Tea Ring | Sarah J. Hauser
Swedish Tea Ring | Sarah J. Hauser
Swedish Tea Ring | Sarah J. Hauser
Swedish Tea Ring | Sarah J. Hauser
Swedish Tea Ring | Sarah J. Hauser
Swedish Tea Ring | Sarah J. Hauser
Swedish Tea Ring | Sarah J. Hauser
Swedish Tea Ring | Sarah J. Hauser
Swedish Tea Ring | Sarah J. Hauser
Swedish Tea Ring | Sarah J. Hauser
Swedish Tea Ring | Sarah J. Hauser
Swedish Tea Ring | Sarah J. Hauser
Swedish Tea Ring | Sarah J. Hauser

Before you bake, I want to give you a few notes on the recipe. This version yields two tea rings. If you don’t need both, this makes a great gift for a neighbor! You could cut the dough recipe in half, but I haven’t actually ever done that myself, so I wrote the recipe as I’ve always made it. Yeast doughs can be finicky, so I didn’t want to mess with what I’ve always done. Common toppings for this include maraschino cherries and nuts, but I usually leave off the cherries and just serve it with a simple glaze and plenty of butter.


Swedish Tea Ring
Yields 2 Tea Rings
Slightly Adapted from Betty Crocker’s Cookbook, 1972

Traditional Sweet Roll Dough (Dough recipe yields 2 tea rings)*

2 packages active dry yeast
½ cup warm water
½ cup lukewarm milk
½ cup granulated sugar
1 teaspoon salt
2 eggs
½ cup unsalted butter, softened
4 ½ - 5 cups all-purpose flour
Cooking spray or butter for greasing

Add the yeast to a large bowl. Pour in the water and stir until the yeast dissolves. Add the milk, sugar, salt, eggs, butter, and 2 cups of flour. Mix until smooth. Add in the remaining flour until the dough is easy enough to handle.

Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured board or countertop. Knead the dough until it’s smooth and elastic, about 5 minutes. (You can also use a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook.) Grease a large bowl and place the dough in the bowl, then turn it so the greased side is up.

Cover with a kitchen towel and let it rise in a warm place for about an hour and a half, or until double in size. (In the winter in my house, I usually turn the oven on about 300 and then place the dough near the oven. Otherwise, my cold house makes it take forever to rise.)

Punch down the dough and divide it evenly in half.

* If you don’t want to make two tea rings, you can also use the other half of the dough to make cinnamon rolls or other breakfast treats!

For the tea ring (these amounts are for 1 tea ring)

½ recipe of Traditional Sweet Roll Dough
3 Tablespoons unsalted butter, softened
½ cup brown sugar
1 ½ teaspoons cinnamon
½ cup raisins
½ cup walnuts (optional)

On a floured surface, roll out the dough into a large rectangle, about 15x9 inches. Spread the butter all over and sprinkle on the brown sugar and cinnamon. Then add the raisins and walnuts (if using).

Roll the dough lengthwise, and pinch the edges of the dough together to seal it. You can also use a little butter to glue the edges together.

Grease a baking sheet or cover with parchment paper. Transfer the dough to the baking sheet. Shape it into a circle, stretching it to make it even and then pressing the ends together to seal (glue with butter if needed).

With a scissors, make cuts ⅔ of the way through the dough, about 1-inch apart. Gently turn each section on its side. Cover and and let rise until double, about 30-45 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Bake the tea rings for about 20 minutes.** Drizzle with vanilla glaze (recipe below) and serve warm with butter.

**We usually make the tea rings a few weeks in advance and then underbake them slightly (baking time is about 16-18 minutes). Then we defrost the tea rings in the fridge the night before and reheat in a low temp oven until warmed through.

Vanilla Glaze (this is enough for 1 tea ring)

1 cup powdered sugar
1-2 Tablespoons of whole milk (depending on how thick you like the glaze)
½ teaspoon vanilla extract

In a bowl, whisk together the powdered sugar, milk, and vanilla until smooth. Drizzle on the warm tea ring.